The Great Summer Lane Splitting Confustication and BBQ

By Gerde Applethwaite

Shorter: Things is hottin’ up in the old Cali corral when it comes to lane splitting. Let’s try to sort it out a bit.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back out onto the freeway and ride the dashed white lines it turns out that the California Highway Patrol has had something of a change of spirit when it comes to lane splitting. Someone filed a legal action that contends that the CHP’s (now prior) stance was tantamount to legally condoning lane splitting.  As a consequence of this action the CHP has pulled its lane splitting guidelines and effectively 404′d their position on the CHP home site.

laneIs lane splitting now legal in California? Yes, but many in California seem to believe that it is in a limbo state where it is neither legal nor illegal – just uncodified. Previously there was a bill introduced in the state that would have made splitting illegal.  SB350 never made it into law and lane splitting, thankfully, continued to remain a legal practice. There is a website that helps sort this out and it is ever more useful now that the CHP’s own site has disappeared its previous position.

Surj Gish has done a commendable job of putting together a website dedicated to making sense of the lane splitting fight (note: much of the information for this post comes from his site.)  The mother ship for lane splitting info is called <lanesplittingislegal.com> The site is well done and filled with information that makes a convincing case for lane splitting. The AMA (yes, the motorcyclists not the doctors) has taken a stand on lane splitting as well. Check out the AMA site.

The CHP’s most recent position on lane splitting, until this most recent shift in attitude, was written circa 2012 and is as follows:

1) Lane splitting by motorcycles is not illegal in California when done in a safe and prudent manner.

2) Motorists should not take it upon themselves to discourage motorcyclists from lane splitting.

3) Intentionally blocking or impeding a motorcyclist in a way that could cause harm to a rider is illegal (CVC 22400.)

4) Opening a vehicle door to impede a motorcyclist is illegal (CVC 22517.)

5) Never drive while distracted

6) You can keep motorcyclists and all road users safe by:

A) Checking mirrors and blind spots, especially before changing lanes or turning.

B) Signaling your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic.

C) Allowing more following distance, 3 or 4 seconds, when behind a motorcycle so the               motorcyclist has enough time to maneuver or stop in an emergency.

All of this has been yanked from the CHP site as a direct consequence of this legal action – we are now in a state of minor confusion, again.

lane-splittingMe, I am much in favor of the splitting of lanes when done with a modicum of prudence. I have, for years, minded the gap on both the Bay Bridge and also with the stalled traffic before the yawping mouth of the Caldecott Tunnel.  When traffic slows to a crawl I split lanes rather than sitting there waiting for my air cooled Guzzi to overheat.  I do not split when traffic is rolling at anything more than, say, 20 mph.

My favorite lane splitting moment (yes, I have a favorite) was on a trip from Amsterdam to Prague. When you leave Dresden you enter the mountains and forested winding roads; It is good bike riding country. When you get some few kilometers from the border of the Czech Republic the traffic backs up to a dead stop – I mean a dead stop, like the L.I.E. on the way to Jones Beach on a summer Saturday morning – dead stop. Lane splitting through 6 kilometers of hobbled traffic to get to the border checkpoint is heaven in a can. Nobody in the line of cars freaks out, shakes their fists or opens their car doors in a homicidal blocking maneuver – none of that, but you come back home though and my god there is a nutball on every 3rd commute.

Something happens to a lot of folks once they get into the car. The big mobile container of glass and steel becomes The-Box-of-Privilege.  Folks who would never scream at someone when they stride past them on the sidewalk seem to have no compunction about unleashing a torrent of crazy-ass spew at motorcyclists on the roadway. Folks (thankfully the rare ones) who would normally never physically assault someone in boots and a leather jacket when they amble by them, pushing their shopping carts in the box store parking lot, seem to revel in the fantasy or the act of obstructing a motorcyclist by dooring or faux-dooring her.  There is yet one more technique employed by the angry, privileged cager to keep those bikers from getting past.  It is the squeeze play.  The cager spies in the rear view a lane splitter coming up on them and they steer their car over toward the edge of the lane to block the bike’s path. Now you have a scenario where a petulant locked-down cager has an angry biker directly behind them. What sort of lunatic finds satisfaction in this?

The-Box-of-Privilege makes this possible. You are secure in your bubble of steel and glass and this will accommodate all manner of Hyde-like behavior. I went to a barbeque in Santa Monica recently and those in attendance were a mixed bag of motorcyclists and also cage drivers who had limited or no moto experience. It becomes bizarre to hear some of the ice cube rattling umbrage taken by (a percentage of) cage drivers once they are tanked up on a couple of early afternoon citrusy vodkas. They rail and mumble against lane splitting bikers on their freeways.  Underlying it all is the sense that someone is getting ahead of you; you wouldn’t let them cut in line at the store why would you let them cut in line on the freeway? Madness, its all madness. No one on a bike is getting something that you could have had but for the fact that the biker cut in line. There is no limited-amount prize booth at the end of your commute. The lane splitting biker will neither speed nor slow your progress to the job or to your home. Let them go. Let them go. Listen you crazy %*#holes, just say  “¡Vaya Con Dios!”  Let them go.

The public in my home state needs to know that lane splitting is legal here and they also need to know that motorcyclists are allowed to use the H.O.V. lanes. The education on these things is woefully lacking. The current retreat by the CHP on lane splitting only serves to muddy the waters… or uh, fog up the face shield… or uh… wait, I got one…. uhm.

Yes, alright, it doesn’t help that there are idiots on bikes too. Some pillock who goes flying by at a breakneck pace while threading the needle between decently moving cars does nothing to sell the lane splitting product. Once while heading uphill on highway 4 toward Pittsburg, CA (while in my Pickup-Truck-of-Privilege) I witnessed a guy on a chopper lane splitting at a demonic rate of speed. He came up on us pretty fast and never made it beyond the cab of the big rig truck just ahead of me and one lane over. He caromed off of the truck and into the car adjacent… and back again… and wound up on the ground with his left leg twisted agonizingly in a manner that screamed “Ninety days in a cast, Vicodin and some nice titanium pins to boot.” It happens. Individual vignettes like this do not represent the whole.

As time goes on things will change and California will not be the only state at the forefront of lane splitting rights.  The lack of understanding of lane splitting’s common sense amongst the cage driving public needs to be repaired. Gish is going a long way in that regard. Go to his site and follow the links, talk to your neighbors at the next barbeque and see if you can come to some brighter understanding with them about lane splitting. I’ll have a dirty martini – i’m not driving.

Gerde

THE MAD COW ON TOUR

By Gerde Applethwaite

I stepped out of my front door and did an immediate double take … and then another. Not forty feet away, across the street was something that was part Ghost Rider, part Jurassic Park and part Ray Harryhausen. It was quite simply the skeleton of a cow draped over a motorcycle. I had every sense that this was real because my hallucinations just don’t run this way.  I had spied Billie G. Lynn’s extraordinary “Mad Cow Motorcycle Project.”

unnamed

Billie is a sculptor on a summer tour with this project. To date she has made her way from Florida to the West Coast to eventually loop back home. She draws a crowd whenever she stops – whether she is astride the cow skeleton creation or when it is trailered behind her truck. The massive skull of the cow sits out front where the headlight nacelle would be and serves as something of a maidenhead on the scariest pirate ship ever – or maybe another decorative fillip on one of the Reever ships from Firefly (bet that takes you back, huh?) The skull is the first thing to breach the wind as the Mad Cow comes up on you – small headlights to its left and right. Yes, its eery and weird and nearly impossible to take your eyes from: It must be doubly spooky at night. The pictures on Billie’s website do not do it justice. <madcowcycles.com> Go to her Facebook page and follow the adventure and the documentary in the making <https://www.facebook.com/MadCowCycles>

Billie is sprightly, bright-eyed and clever. Two minutes with her and you understand the mission of the summer tour and the reason for the Mad Cow Motorcycle. She revels in telling one and all what she’s up to.  Billie is (as am I) a vegan and the project is designed to inform as many people as possible of the dangers of eating meat both for their personal health and for that of the planet. Take a look at the info on her site and follow some of the links. It is eye opening stuff…. ohh, and some links will take you to excellent vegan recipes.  At its core is her attempt to “spread the word about factory farming and encourage people across the country to eat less meat.” Worthy goals as far as I am concerned and if it takes the nightmare vision of a ghost cow made of bone and steel to get your attention then so be it.

The bike itself was fabbed from the ground up (pictures on the site) with an assist from a friend named Sam Coleman.  At it’s heart is an 18 horsepower Kubota diesel engine. The engine runs on vegie oil diesel fuel that she has the ability to process on the road. This effectively means that the only reason she has to stop at a burger joint is to get some fuel for the Mad Cow. It also means that her smog output from the tail pipe is substantially reduced. The engine outputs directly to a right angle gearbox with a wide belt drive sprocket on it. The belt then loops over to a transmission and finally a chain from the trany to the rear wheel. The rear tire is a modern, low, fat tire; the front is guided by an old school leading-link springer fork setup reminiscent of the best of choppers. The taillight looks to be a bullet type off of an old big fin caddy from the fifties flanked by two very small LED turn signals.

I won’t go into detail about the cow skeleton – just look at the pictures – it beggars description. If you see Billie while she is out on her adventure give her a big howdy – go up and say hello. She is completely friendly and approachable – only the bike is scary. Meanwhile give the Facebook page a look see.

Gerde

NOT MY THING

By Gerde Applethwaite

gold-spray-paintWhen I was a kid my dad had this thing with gold spray paint.  His version of a clean tidy look for many of his tools and most of his garden equipment involved a drill with a wire brush attached and some sort of degreasing agent – all of it topped off with his can of gold spray paint. We had a gold lawnmower or two, gold shovels, gold hedge trimmers, a gold sledge hammer (just the weighty end) and on. On a warm Saturday, late morning, we would often smell throughout the house the second pot of coffee on the brew followed sometime not long after by the distinct noise of the spray can rattle – then the coffee aroma would be overwhelmed by the spray paint. I didn’t inherit his penchant for spraying everything up. My shovels are all a bit rusty on the blade ends and his looked like he had just come back in from a groundbreaking ceremony.  Not my thing.

Choppers and bobbers are not my thing. Scooters are also not my thing. I will support your right to ride a bobber until they pry the angled digital tire gauge out of my cold dead hands. Bobbers look comfy to me and I respect that – comfy works for me. Choppers simultaneously shout “hey, look at me” and “hey, what are you lookin’ at?”  The thing that I respect about choppers though is the amount of real fabrication craft on display with most of them. Scooters just scare me – those small wheels. I lean in another direction.

One of my favorite bikes is a custom made machine by O.Ray Courtney using a 1930 Henderson as a base. It is a jaw dropper of art deco excess and I saw it on Bikeexif a while back. What an incredible piece of sheet metal sculpture. I also like the looks of an old Parilla 250cc race bike for pretty much the opposite reasons; it is spare, cut down and devoted to nothing other than the race. The stuff, any of the stuff, cranked out by Germany’s Kaffeemaschine is fine by me. They specialize in, among other things, turning Tonti-frame Moto Guzzi’s into exquisite cafe bikes. Some will disagree. The thought of turning any Guzzi into a cafe bike sends them into paroxysms of spew.  To each their own.

On the West coast fabricators and the mechanically inclined have been puttering away in their garages all year long but in the East and Mid-West they have recently dug out of a cold tinker-inhibiting winter.  It’s time to get out the box of sockets, the angle grinder and the (god help us) can of gold spray paint to start modding out your ride. I like sitting out at a picnic table with blank paper and a sharpened pencil to hand, a cold IPA within reach and good company to tell me what they think I should be doing to the bike instead of whatever it is I have just sketched out. Good times.

Watch out for bloody knuckles. Do not reach for the spray can until you have found your dust mask, make sure your bike is properly propped up and most of all have a good time.

Gerde

 

 

SPRING BE SPRUNG

By Gerde Applethwaite

Shorter: Buy the gear, scooter people.

scoot1

In my neck of the woods the riding season really never ends but the warm weather has just now come on with a vengeance. The streets are filled with bicyclists, motorcyclists of all stripes and of course scooter people. Birds are chirping and squidly guys with yoshimuras are sending out their mating calls. Its time for me to do my yearly get-your-bike-ready post but before that a post with my obligatory quasi-rant about the under-clothed.

Not so long ago there was a guy in my neighborhood who rode a beat up old ninja. He sported tank top t-shirts  and a chrome beanie helmet. His major claims to fame were not his wardrobe choices but the fact he couldn’t seem to go for too many blocks before he popped a wheelie. He got quite good at it. He would go for blocks and run through lights. He isn’t around anymore. I don’t know where he is but my first guess involves a prone trip to the hospital.

Glaringly obvious to me as I wander our local highways and bi-ways are the number of scooter riders who are wearing no other safety gear than the mandated helmet. The scooter people by and large do not get it.  The vast majority of powered 2 wheel accidents occur at an overall average of 35 miles per hour. You are more likely to experience an unwitting and unwilling mating with someone else’s sheet metal if you are riding on the urban/suburban streets.

A scooter’s smaller wheels make them more skittish on the road than your average motorcycle.  Add to this the fact that idiots are still going to text their way into your scooter with their 4,000 pounds of steel – this trend shows no signs of diminishing. If you are out sooterating in your sandals and t-shirt and shorts you are just asking for it. It is at this point that I would inject my usual rant about the gear but I will forgo it for now because I bore myself with it at this point. Those of you who are out there riding free likely have more than a vague idea of the hazards. So, let’s just assume for a moment that I just gave you 5 or 6 well reasoned arguments to invest a little money in a jacket, gloves, pants and boots.

We have a nice assortment of these things and heck you’re here anyway – take a look

Gerde

SPRING THING

By Gerde Applethwaite

There are ritually repeated memes in moto blog posts; there are oil threads and there are tire posts and there are others of the same ilk that seem to keep the moto blogosphere arguing with itself about the proper course of action. They are well known enough that they are usually qualified with some eye rolling and apologies before the original poster commences. In a minor constellation there is the thread about whether or not to wash your bike. Welcome to this year’s celebration of Spring. Herein I will lean into the wind and signify next to nothing. Let’s commence.

wash2

I come down somewhere in the middle of the great unwashed thread. The anti-washites state that you are likely to contaminate your oil system by forcing your soapy water onto and into your bike’s parts. They also mention the likelihood of tweaking something in your electrics. Good points. The washists will tell you that dirt on your motor inhibits your engine from radiating out heat and adds to ongoing corrosion – oh, and it makes your bike look like crap. I agree that you should never take your bike to the wand car wash. The pressure is too great and you are likely to mess something up. Sure, take your dirt bike there and get the grunge off of the wheels and the frame of the bike but spray carefully when you get around the wheel bearings, the engine and the electrics. I use the common garden hose and a bucket of soapy water. I have never had a problem with this method but I am careful.

California is in the midst of a drought so there is yet another reason not to wash your bike at all. I think my compromise on this is going to be to ride out to a friend’s place in the near burbs, park the bike in the middle of their lawn and wash the thing with a green soap that the lawn will not dislike.

I have a project bike with a sad seat. It is in need of a reupholster but for this season I think I just want to get it back on the road and I will deal with the cosmetics bit by bit in the latter part of the season. My seat is not at the point where the foam beneath is being shredded but the vinyl is torn in places. Sewing up the seat while the seat cover remains on the bike is beyond my skill set. I have heard that they make a vinyl, adhesive backed, repair tape. I think that might be the ticket for right now.

I don’t mess around with tires. I mean, I don’t push it. When the tires are starting to go I put on new set. When I was a young, stupid and impoverished student I ran the tires on my CL77 down to the threads and lived to tell the tale but I am no longer young and (arguably) less stupid.  I don’t want to drop a lot of money into tires on the project bike and I have been told by other CB350 cultists that there is an inexpensive Shinko tire getting surprisingly good reviews. It will give me piece of mind to get these old tires off the Honda.

Wheel bearings and steering head bearings are a lot cheaper if you go to a bearing shop rather than the dealer for your parts. Some of the bearing shops will not sell you anything if you tell them the parts are for a motorcycle. Why? Dunno – maybe its a fear of being embroiled in some sort of litigation if you put them on incorrectly and then get into an accident. My steering head bearing is notchy – has to go.

I am going with a heated gear setup on the touring bike this fall and I am not sure that my alternator is sparky enough to keep up. This has led me to investigate LED headlights and taillights. The market is growing every month and an upgrade to LED’s is in my future. Check your state’s rules before you spring for an LED headlamp as some do not yet allow it.

I have just adapted my first aid kit to fit under the seat of the CB350. There is much less room  there than in the Flying Brick so I had to divide it up into two segments. I was still able to get it all under the seat.

Springtime is the official beginning of bike tinkering season.  I live for this time of year. Get on out there.

Gerde

 

Helmet Designs for Tomorrow – Today

By Gerde Applethwaite

Bell recently announced that they are designing a helmet with an EPS liner that can be custom shaped to your individual head. I do not know whether or not this will be more comfortable on a long ride but intuitively I would think so. It also seems that in the event of a crash it would distribute and cushion the impact across your head better than a traditional unit. This got me to thinking about the future of helmet design and what we might have in store.

I like the idea of a custom molded helmet liner but more than that I would like to have an off the shelf helmet with a D3O or Sastech liner. The molecular armor would be more effective than the ubiquitous EPS foam in helping insulate your head bone against the shock of an impact, albeit a bit more expensive. D3O makes a helmet liner but I have never seen one in a helmet.

Reebok is making a small electronic device called the Checklight that installs into football helmets. It determines the shock force of an impact and reads it out. That’s clever. The notion of having some more objective way to evaluate the extent of an impact after your crash might be useful to the folks in the ER and it also might give you pause to think before you jumped back on your bike after what you thought was a small get-off.

Fighter jet style heads-up displays are already being designed for motorcycle helmet use. They are an interesting idea but they are not for me. I don’t want anything in my visual plain that will in any way distract me from scanning the road although I would consider one that displayed a visual warning if, say, the oil pressure dropped suddenly or the water temperature rose suddenly on my bike.

Photochromic face shields are available on some new Bell and Shoei helmets and I intend to test them out sometime this Summer. I like the idea of a shield that will change its shade in response to the light but I don’t believe that the current photochromic shields are polarized. I would like to see the polarized shields become more available across product lines.

The state of helmet communications systems improves with every season. Not that long ago they were scratchy and sounded like a bad walkie talkie but today the sound is markedly better and you can also hook up your phone and music devices. Things will rapidly change and become more even more innovative with these systems – and quickly at that.

Helmet shell plastics technology only gets better with every passing season.  Carbon fiber and Kevlar are still only available in the more expensive offerings but as the manufacturing techniques develop further we will see carbon and Kevlar migrating into lower priced helmets. New types of helmet shell materials are right around the corner and these new materials make my first helmet seem like a real antique bucket.

If you have an older helmet I recommend that you take a look at some of the newer helmet designs – whether it be comm. systems, drop down inner shields or pinlock setups the future is now… or at least soon.

Gerde Applethwaite

New Gear Learning Curve

By Gerde Applethwaite

honda_classic2_CB125A neighbor on my block just bought a bike. Its his first bike and he chose well. The vintage Honda 125 will be perfect to allow him to build riding skills without worrying about the weight of a full-sized machine.  He goes to college and his rides will be a combination of commutes to school, trips to the store, to see friends and also rides in the hills. Rides to the gas station will be few and far between which is smart considering his student budget.

Here in California you have to wear a helmet so he popped for a flat black open face unit because he likes the retro look of the open face. He is talking about cafeing out the bike and the helmet will be part of the look. At some point down the road he wants to swap in a bolt-on cafe racer seat kit. Its going to cost him a bit over $200.

He rides in a denim jacket, jeans and street shoes. I have forgotten what he is using for gloves but if I recall when I last saw him ride off he wasn’t wearing any.  He was stoked about getting some retro goggles to help complete the whole cafe look.

He is a new rider and he is young. He doesn’t want to think about riding gear, he wants to think about the paint scheme for his cafe racer seat.  He is going to have to make a choice. Does he go for the cafe seat kit or does he delay that and go for a jacket and some riding boots? You know where I stand. One crash and he could be out not only the bike but the balance of a semester. The gear makes all the difference.

We have jackets, gloves and boots that will not break the bank and they will go a long way toward helping to keep you out of a cast. As you get more experience (and a bit more cash) you will want to upgrade your gear — get some armored riding pants that zip to your jacket or step up to a different jacket with, say, molecular armor. If you are a new rider you owe it yourself when you are out zipping around to talk to the other riders that you meet about the gear they ride with and why they chose it.

Gerde Applethwaite

Get-Offs In Slo-Mo

By Gerde Applethwaite

A guy falling off his motorcycleI was watching the Olympics a while back and the crashes of the downhill skiers caught my eye.  The slo-mo replays of somebody biffing it on a downhill run have some resonance with a motorcycle get-off. You got to see the way in which the body automatically, in the absurdly brief time available, attempts to set up for the fall.  Arms and legs splay akimbo but there is often just enough time to put out your hands or feet in a defensive posture.

The yootoobz be full of slo-mo viddys of motorcycle get-offs. They run the gamut from CCTV of Chinese scooter accidents on busy streets to wobbly Isle of Man TT high-sides or the fixed camera setups of weekend riders who go wide out of a turn on Mulholland. There is a similarity between many of the bike get-offs and the downhill skiing fly-offs. Basically, in both you have yer low-sides and yer high-sides. The low-side skiers (if they maintain consciousness and are fortunate enough to remain unbroken) are attempting to push against the slope in a braking maneuver. The high-side skiers, when slowed down enough, often have the look of an old slapstick cartoon where the poor boffo is swimming in air.  Also the high-siders will put an arm down to broach the distance between themselves and impending doom. Its an automatic reaction – skiers do it, skateboarders do it, bicyclists and motorcyclists too. If you watch professional football you will all too often see a receiver on the edge of the field catch a pass and then step one foot out of bounds to maintain balance. The pass is ruled ‘not a reception’ because you need 2 feet inbound at the time of the catch. The better players have trained themselves to drag that second foot keeping 2 feet inbound and just taking the fall. It is counter intuitive to just take the fall. The football players earn 6, 7 and 8 figure salaries and train for this sort of stuff constantly but on the day they will still, instinctively, put that foot out to brake the fall or prevent it.

I recently wrote a post about road rash and one of the pieces of information I decided not to include in that post (not because I deemed it uninteresting but in a rare attempt at keeping the post brief) was Dr. Flash Gordon’s* information about the ways in which infection can cause serious permanent damage to your body.  If you have a full thickness road rash on your hand or you have torn up the area around a joint be very careful; infections consequent to this can cause permanent damage to your hand.  So there you are in mid-air in the midst of your soon-to-be expensive high side as you and your CBR part company and you reflexively (in the micro-seconds afforded to you) stick one or both of your ungloved hands out toward the approaching pavement. You snap a wrist or two, tear open the skin and then pivot onto your t-shirt covered shoulder; some sliding …. and you stop – let’s say partially under a parked car. Just for the purposes of full disclosure I should say that something similar happened to me. The details are a bit different: it was a parked semi-tractor trailer, it was raining, and I was all ATGATT’d out but the sense is the same – one second you are riding blissfully along and then somehow you are the star of your own brief, slo-mo, get-off cartoon.

In a low-side you will quite often not have time to pull your leg from between the side of the bike and the pavement. This is an ugly sandwich. Its the luck of the draw whether or not you break your ankle and mangle toes. It really depends upon where your leg just happens to be, the shape of the bike, the terrain of the road bed and, not least, your foot wear. The skiers often have time and free room to do that kicking, braking, steering motion but even if you could it will be of little avail to you with one leg trapped under your bike. Maybe in your low-side the bike slides out ahead of you or off to the side – that could be lucky. You see it on the race track frequently enough – Rossi slides on his back at 80 MPH and lives to sign autographs later that day. I mean it could be lucky if your chosen path did not lead toward an impact with something that will mangle you. Good luck. I find it somewhat comical when I see a guy on a sport bike wearing shorts and a t-shirt but he has frame sliders installed on his bike. He is aware that a crash might happen and he has taken the time to install something that will help minimize the damage to his costy fiberglass but he has thought not one wit about what will happen to his body in the same scenario. DOH.

Women, you’re not out of this either. You think your jeggings and cute boots will protect you in a crash? It is to laugh. The pressure on women to look good while doing anything and while being anywhere is crazy-making. It discombobulates any reasoned approach to the purchase of riding gear. When I commuted to work by motorcycle I wore an old Air Force flight suit, helmet, gloves and boots. I kept a pair of shoes at work. My commute was fully suited out in protective gear but underneath I wore my work clothes. A Joe Rocket Survivor Suit is my current kit and it does the same duty. I really didn’t care all that much how I looked on the bike although I like the look of the Joe Rocket.  I wasn’t out there to look gooey nectar on my commute. These days I am astonished at the number of women who wear clothing that will do them less than no good when they are riding. She wears the helmet and a pair of leather garden gloves and no other protective gear. Believe me they will cut those pricey jeggings off of you in a heartbeat in the ER.

I used to like one particular Italian restaurant in San Francisco’s North Beach. The first time I showed up there to meet friends I was confronted just inside the front door by the maitre d’ who politely explained to me that there was a dress code and that my flight suit was not appropriate. I laughed and told him that I expected to check it and then started to doff the suit. Underneath I was wearing clothing acceptable to management and everybody was happy.  It is possible to plan an evening out on the town and still wear riding gear that will help keep you safe – they are not mutually exclusive. The maitre d’ got to know me and would make a comic flourish out of welcoming me when I came in. It was fun for us both.  Yes, my boots were a bit out of the norm but it became my look. Trust me, you can wear your motorcycle boots to the opera and as long as everything you are wearing is black you will get away with it just fine (note: boots with lotsa buckles can make a sound that is annoying to those sitting next to you.)

Take a look at the online videos of riders going down and make some reasoned decisions about how you want to look when you are the one staring up at the sky after a crash. Do you want to be she who is wearing very little riding gear and has to be carted off to the ER or do you want to extend the chances that you will not be carted anywhere and wear the ATGATT? There are ways to wear the gear that won’t inhibit your social life or your look.

*Note: Dr. Flash Gordon’s book Blood, Sweat and 2nd Gear: More Medicine for Motorcyclists is available from White Horse Press.

 

Gerde Applethwaite

IJMS Conference – 2014 in Colorado

By Gerde Applethwaite

The International Journal of Motorcycle Studies is a group of folk who roll around in the research and the writing centered around things motorcycle [not to be confused with the International Journal of molecular Sciences – they do something on a quite different scale.]  If you go to the IJMS main site you will see all manner of really intriguing papers written by riders, some academics – some not. It is truly great stuff. Its not just for motorcycle journalists, the topics vary widely. I have burned up hours and hours reading really fascinating papers gathered under the IJMS rubric. I recommend it to all y’all.

This year the 2014 IJMS conference is going to be held in the States, in Colorado. If you can carve out the time in mid-July to make it to the conference I will see you there. I will not be presenting a paper (BTW, final submission date is march 1st)  but I will be attending as many panels as I can.

Check it out:

http://ijms.nova.edu/

https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1309315

See you in Colorado Springs,

Gerde Applethwaite

Road Pizza: A Most Unwelcome Roadside Treat

 By Gerde Applethwaite

“Once again I race toward Dr. Flash Gordon’s brilliant motorcycle
first aid book entitled Blood, Sweat and 2nd Gear: More Medicine for
Motorcyclists.  I suspect it is no coincidence that his first chapter
starts with road rash, pavement dermatitis.”

The Weather on the Left Coast at the time of writing is still mostly dry and mostly warm. In other parts of the country the cold havoc reigns supreme. The scooter evolution is in full swing here and for reasons somewhat beyond my understanding scooter riders seem to have a penchant for Teva’s and cargo shorts. The vast majority of motorcycle/scooter accidents occur at under 30 miles per hour. The bi-product of the under dressed and the over-accelerated is road rash or as we affectionately call it – road pizza (you will know why if you have ever seen it.)

Once again I race toward Dr. Flash Gordon’s brilliant motorcycle first aid book entitled Blood, Sweat and 2nd Gear: More Medicine for Motorcyclists.  I suspect it is no coincidence that his first chapter starts with road rash, pavement dermatitis. This is a really common condition for the under dressed who ride – whether it be on bicycles, skateboards, scooters or motorcycles. What I wasn’t aware of were the complications that can ensue from an improperly treated road rash. Yeah, you should wear the right clothing and we sell the right clothing but for right now let’s just focus on a few select notions from Blood, Sweat and 2nd Gear.

(Picture Taken from Wiki How)

You need to get as much of the dirt out of the wound as you can. Any leftover dirt can produce scarring at best and complications from a serious infection at worst. I knew a guy in high school who did a face plant while on his bicycle; he hit a poorly designed road grate. They didn’t get all of the gravel out of his road rash wound and years later you could still see the occasional dark bits of gravel on the side of his face. Sometimes a little chunk of gravel would work its way to the surface causing intense itching until it finally broke loose of the skin – some bits stayed where they were. The broken skin is incredibly sensitive to stuff like Betadine or even tap water. It alone will send your nerve endings howling. Saline solution is better.  Contact lens solution is actually good. I now carry a bottle of it under the seats of both bikes, along side the small first aid kit.  Again, this is thanks to having read the Flash Gordon MD. book/s. Read them – no foolin’. The idea in this first phase is to get as much of the dirt and germs out of the wound as possible. The longer the microbes party in your road pizza wound the more you will pay for it later. If all you have is tap water then use that – get the wound clean.

Yes, the next phase is to protect the wound. Dr. Gordon no longer recommends antibiotic ointments like Neosporin for this. I didn’t know this. I knew enough to try clean the wound but then my first reaction would have been to slather it all up with something Like Neosporin then put down gauze 4×4′s and finally pave it all over with tape. Wrong. The wound needs to be cleaned but not dried out. The ointment will actually dry out the wound. You have a couple of ways to go here.

One is something called a semi-occlusive dressing like Tegaderm or Opsite for example. You apply the film onto and around the wound. It adheres to healthy skin around the wound both protecting the area and allowing the wound to breathe. This can be packed into your first aid kit as well as the saline solution and your other stuff. It really doesn’t take up that much room and if you don’t need it for yourself you may one day need it for someone else.

An alternative means to protect the cleaned wound site is to spray on some stuff out of a can that films over and will rapidly give you some protection. The products noted in Blood, Sweat and 2nd Gear are 3m’s Nexcare or something called Medi-Stat. I have the Nexcare in my kit. I haven’t seen the Medi-Stat in my local pharmacy. Gordon mentions that the added advantage of using the spray is that if you are the wounded one and you find yourself without help you will have an easier time of it by spraying something onto the wound site than you will applying a sheet film because you can one-hand it. Good tip.

You’re not out of the woods yet. You still risk serious infection and the potential consequences of infection turn out to be more than a little startling. I’m not going to go into it here because I want to keep this piece brief. Read the book (have I said that already?) or at least go online and do some research. At some point, either at the time of the initial accident or later when you suspect infection you may need to seek medical help. Do not hesitate to get it.

Finally a word, directly from my experience, about hospitals. Not all hospitals are created equally. I am given to understand that ambulance crews are not obligated to take you to your hospital of choice – they are obligated to take you to the nearest hospital. Now its roulette. If you are unfortunate to be taken to a crappy hospital or to one that has an overburdened emergency room (often one and the same) then you are really at the mercy of the fates. I happen to live in an area where the local hospital — the one that I would be taken to in the event of a neighborhood accident — has a stupefyingly poor reputation for everything except gun shot wounds – they appear to be good at that and they get a lot practice. If you show up with a road pizza shoulder and/or face you could realistically wait for 12 hours before you are seen depending upon who got shot before you showed up – or while you waiting. Do you want to risk that just so that you can feel the warm breeze blowing up your cargo shorts? Buy some riding gear, fool!

Gerde Applethwaite