SPRING THING

By Gerde Applethwaite

There are ritually repeated memes in moto blog posts; there are oil threads and there are tire posts and there are others of the same ilk that seem to keep the moto blogosphere arguing with itself about the proper course of action. They are well known enough that they are usually qualified with some eye rolling and apologies before the original poster commences. In a minor constellation there is the thread about whether or not to wash your bike. Welcome to this year’s celebration of Spring. Herein I will lean into the wind and signify next to nothing. Let’s commence.

wash2

I come down somewhere in the middle of the great unwashed thread. The anti-washites state that you are likely to contaminate your oil system by forcing your soapy water onto and into your bike’s parts. They also mention the likelihood of tweaking something in your electrics. Good points. The washists will tell you that dirt on your motor inhibits your engine from radiating out heat and adds to ongoing corrosion – oh, and it makes your bike look like crap. I agree that you should never take your bike to the wand car wash. The pressure is too great and you are likely to mess something up. Sure, take your dirt bike there and get the grunge off of the wheels and the frame of the bike but spray carefully when you get around the wheel bearings, the engine and the electrics. I use the common garden hose and a bucket of soapy water. I have never had a problem with this method but I am careful.

California is in the midst of a drought so there is yet another reason not to wash your bike at all. I think my compromise on this is going to be to ride out to a friend’s place in the near burbs, park the bike in the middle of their lawn and wash the thing with a green soap that the lawn will not dislike.

I have a project bike with a sad seat. It is in need of a reupholster but for this season I think I just want to get it back on the road and I will deal with the cosmetics bit by bit in the latter part of the season. My seat is not at the point where the foam beneath is being shredded but the vinyl is torn in places. Sewing up the seat while the seat cover remains on the bike is beyond my skill set. I have heard that they make a vinyl, adhesive backed, repair tape. I think that might be the ticket for right now.

I don’t mess around with tires. I mean, I don’t push it. When the tires are starting to go I put on new set. When I was a young, stupid and impoverished student I ran the tires on my CL77 down to the threads and lived to tell the tale but I am no longer young and (arguably) less stupid.  I don’t want to drop a lot of money into tires on the project bike and I have been told by other CB350 cultists that there is an inexpensive Shinko tire getting surprisingly good reviews. It will give me piece of mind to get these old tires off the Honda.

Wheel bearings and steering head bearings are a lot cheaper if you go to a bearing shop rather than the dealer for your parts. Some of the bearing shops will not sell you anything if you tell them the parts are for a motorcycle. Why? Dunno – maybe its a fear of being embroiled in some sort of litigation if you put them on incorrectly and then get into an accident. My steering head bearing is notchy – has to go.

I am going with a heated gear setup on the touring bike this fall and I am not sure that my alternator is sparky enough to keep up. This has led me to investigate LED headlights and taillights. The market is growing every month and an upgrade to LED’s is in my future. Check your state’s rules before you spring for an LED headlamp as some do not yet allow it.

I have just adapted my first aid kit to fit under the seat of the CB350. There is much less room  there than in the Flying Brick so I had to divide it up into two segments. I was still able to get it all under the seat.

Springtime is the official beginning of bike tinkering season.  I live for this time of year. Get on out there.

Gerde